Pine Bush District Special Education Plan

Pine Bush Central School District

District Special Education Plan

2018-2019

 –

2019-2020

Introduction

Description of Special Education Programs- School Age

Description of Special Education Programs- Preschool Programs

Private & State Supported Schools

Classification & Disability Data

Department Objectives and Methods of Measurement

Allocation of Space/ Alternative materials

Special Education Budget (anticipated)

Board Approval 

Introduction

In accordance with Part 200.2 (c) the Regulations of the Commissioner of Education, the district plan for students is to provide the following:

  • a description of the nature and scope of special education programs and services currently available to students and preschool students residing in the district, including but not limited to descriptions of the district’s resource room programs and each special class program provided by the district in terms of group size and composition;
  • identification of the number and age span of students and preschool students to be served by type of disability, and recommended setting;
  • the method to be used to evaluate the extent to which the objectives of the program have been achieved;
  • a description of the policies and practices of the board of education to ensure the continual allocation of appropriate space within the district for special education programs that meet the needs of students and preschool students with disabilities; and who attend special education programs provided by boards of cooperative educational services;
  • a description of how the district intends to ensure that all instructional materials to be used in the schools of the district will be made available in a usable alternative format, for each student with a disability at the same time as such instructional materials are available to nondisabled students. To meet this requirement, the district plan may incorporate by reference the plan established by the board of education pursuant to paragraph (b)(10) of this section;
  • the estimated budget to support such plan;
  • the date on which such plan was adopted by the board of education.

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Description of Special Education Programs- School Age

The following description of special education services represents program options. Federal and State regulations, as well as best practice, require that students are educated in the Least Restrictive Environment (LRE) that will meet their individual needs. The LRE is determined by the Committee on Special Education.

Related Services

This is the lowest level of special education services on the least restrictive environment continuum. Related services are developmental, corrective, and other supportive services that are required to assist the student with a disability. There follows a summary of available related services:

  • The related services of speech/language therapy, occupational therapy, physical therapy, vision therapy, teacher of hearing and psychological counseling are available to students receiving Response to Intervention services, students with 504 accommodation plans and students with disabilities.

Consultant Teacher Services

The District provides direct and/or in-direct Consultant Teacher Services to students with disabilities in general education classrooms K-12. Special education consultant teachers collaborate with general education teachers to plan instructional accommodations and modifications for students with disabilities in general education settings.

Resource Room

This program is for students with disabilities who are in need of specialized supplementary instruction in a small group setting for a specific subject area such as math or reading.

  • No more than 5 students may be placed in a resource room at any one time.
  • Students are assigned to a resource room program for not less than three hours per week.
  • Students are assigned to a resource room based on similarity of individual needs according to levels of academic achievement, learning characteristics, social and physical development, and management needs.
  • The resource room supports general education through small group review, reinforcement of skills, remediation of learning deficits, pre-teaching new concepts, and supplementing reading or math instruction.

Special Education Special Class K-5 Description

The K-5 SC classroom consists of up to 12 students. Each class has 1 Special Education Teacher and 1 teaching assistant. One class at Pakanasink Elementary School has a ratio of 15:1:2, (15 students, one teacher, and two teaching assistants).  Self-contained classrooms follow the general education curriculum, however, the material is often modified to meet individual student needs.  All instruction is differentiated based on process, product, and content. When a new lesson is taught, the mini-lesson is delivered with whole group instruction. All lessons are modeled and practiced. Re-teaching is a vital part of daily practice. Positive reinforcement, incentives, and encouragement are used throughout the day. The goal is to lead students to a less restrictive environment by fostering independence, responsibility, and problem solving skills.

Integrated Co-Teaching (ICT) K-5

In a K-5 ICT classroom, the planning and instruction are shared by a general education teacher and a special education teacher. Students in ICT learn grade level curriculum. Assignments may be modified at times to ensure student success.  Students with disabilities master specific skills and concepts in the general education setting, with their special education needs and IEP goals being met simultaneously.  In the ICT classroom, there are different teaching models that can be implemented to meet the diverse needs of the students. Teachers switch roles as necessary to target all learning styles. 

Self-Contained (ABLE) Program- (Grades K-2), 8:1:2

In the ABLE (Actively Building Language Environment) classroom, there is one special education teacher, and two classroom paraprofessionals, with a class size ratio of  8:1:2.  Students in this class have delays in several developmental areas, most significantly in the area of communication. Some students have social communication needs and require significant adult support. The use of a picture schedule and other visuals are often part of the classroom dynamic when needed. These students are instructed individually or in small groups where differentiation and individual lessons are taught. Students with these disabilities require a structured, routine based school day with a small student to teacher ratio to be successful in academic, self-help, social-emotional and school environment negotiation domains. Services and academic support are individualized and require repetition, hands-on support with a multi-sensory style of teaching.

Self Contained CASTLE Program- (Grades 3-5) 8:1:2

The CASTLE Program, (Collaborative Academic Social Emotional Teaching and Learning Environment), is a classroom where there is one special education teacher, and two classroom teaching assistants, with a class size ratio of  8:1:2. Students in this class have severe delays in social emotional regulation, including significant anxiety and emotional needs. The students work within the general education curriculum, but require small group instruction with frequent positive reinforcement throughout the school day. A school social worker works collaboratively with the class, infusing social emotional learning through counseling and group lessons.

Self Contained Life Skills Program (Grades 6 – 8)  12:1:2

The Self-Contained Life Skills program is designed for those students transitioning from the Elementary self contained classes who have more significant disabilities and therefore have difficulty learning at the traditional pacing of grade–level academic material. The program offers students an opportunity to receive direct, multisensory instruction in ELA, Math, Science and Social Studies. In addition to learning core content tailored to the student’s individual levels, students participate in a variety of electives including art, music, technology and PE.  The premise of this program is the daily career development aspect which takes place throughout the day to promote independence, responsibility and communication skills. State assessments are often completed through New York State Alternative Assessment.

The Special Class Program (Grades 6 – 12) 15:1

The Special Class at the secondary level offers students the opportunity to receive instruction in a small class environment, 15:1. Students in this program continue to work toward mastery of grade level content and standards by providing specialized, targeted instruction. In addition to these supports students have an opportunity to receive a study hall period that focuses on skills and strategies.

Middle and High School Integrated Co-Teaching (Grades 6-12)

The ICT class offers students with disabilities the opportunity to be integrated with their peers while receiving the support of a special education teacher in each class.   Instruction is delivered by two certified teachers: one general education teacher and one special education teacher.  Instruction is differentiated in all ICT classes in order to meet individual learning needs.  Students enrolled in ICT classes are expected to earn a NYS Regents Diploma. 

Self Contained Life Skills Program (Grades 9-12) 12:1:2

The Life Skills program is appropriate for students with disabilities who meet the NYS requirements for alternate assessment.  All academic classes follow a modified curriculum, which is adjusted according to students’ levels and abilities.  Independent living and social skills are taught and applied throughout the program.  Students are encouraged to participate in the School-to-Work component of the program, which offers students an opportunity to gain experience in an employment setting with the assistance of a job coach.  The PAES Lab integrates simulated work skills into the school day where students act as employees and complete job tasks while being supervised by their teacher. Students can remain in this program until the age of 21. Students leave the high school with a Skills and Academic Achievement Certificate.   

Classes by Building

School Self-Contained Integrated Co-teaching Consultant Teacher Direct/Indirect Related Services
Circleville ES

8:1:2 Grades K-5

12:1:1 ELA/Math Grades 4-5

12:1 Reading Grades 3-5

8:1:2 ABLE Grades K-2

Grades K-5 ELA and Math Grades K-5 Grades K-5
Circleville MS 15:1:1
Grades 6-8
Grades 6-8 Math, Science, Social Studies and ELA Grades 6-8 Grades 6-8
Crispell MS 15:1:1
Grades 6-8
Grades 6-8 Math, Science, Social Studies and ELA Grades 6-8 Grades 6-8
EJ Russell ES 12:1:1
Grades K-5
Grades K-5 ELA and Math Grades K-5 Grades K-5
Pakanasink ES

12:1:1
Grades K-3

15:1:2
Grades 4-5

Grades K-5 ELA and Math Grades K-5 Grades K-5
Pine Bush ES

12:1:1
Grades 2-5

12:1 Reading Grades 3-5

8:1:2 CASTLE Grades 3-5

Grades K-5 ELA and Math Grades K-5 Grades K-5
Pine Bush HS

15:1:1
Grades 9-12 Core Academics only

12:1:2 Life Skills Grades 9-12

Resource Room Grades 9-12

Grades 9-12 Core Academics only Grades 9-12 Grades 9-12

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Description of Special Education Programs- Preschool Age

Related Services – Such services shall be provided by an approved provider or, as authorized by section 4410 of the Education Law, such services shall be provided at a site determined by the board, including but not limited to an approved or licensed prekindergarten or head start program; the work site of the provider; the student’s home; a hospital; a state facility; or a child care location as defined in section 4410 of the Education Law. If the board determines that documented medical or special needs of the preschool student indicate that the student should not be transported to another site the student shall be entitled to receive related services in the preschool student’s home.

Special Education Itinerant Services as defined in Section 4410(1)(k) of Education Law are services provided by a certified special education teacher of an approved program on an itinerant basis at a site determined by the board including but not limited to an approved or licensed pre-kindergarten or head start program; the student’s home; a hospital; a State facility; or a child care location as defined in section 4410 of the Education Law. If the board determines that documented medical or special needs of the preschool student indicate that the student should not be transported to another site, the student shall be entitled to receive special education itinerant services in the preschool student’s home. Such services shall be for the purpose of providing specialized individual or group instruction and/or indirect services to preschool students with disabilities. Indirect services means consultation provided by a certified special education teacher to assist the child’s teacher in adjusting the learning environment and/or modifying their instructional methods to meet the individual needs of a preschool student with a disability who attends an early childhood program. An early childhood program, for purposes of this paragraph, means a regular preschool program or day care program approved or licensed by a governmental agency in which a child under the age of five attends. Special education itinerant services shall be provided to a preschool student with a disability for whom such services have been recommended as follows:

(a) the service shall be recommended by the Committee on Preschool Special Education and shall be included in the student’s individualized education program;

(b) the level of this service should not be less than two hours per week;

(c) the total number of students with disabilities assigned to the special education teacher should not exceed 20;

(d) related services shall be provided in addition to special education itinerant services, in accordance with the student’s IEP;

(e) in the event that the board selects a special service or program that will be provided in the preschool student’s home or another care setting to which the parent has made or subsequently makes arrangements, no transportation shall be indicated.

 Special classes  shall be provided on a half-day or full-day basis pursuant to section 200.1(p), (q) and (v) of this Part and in accordance with section 200.6(h)(2) and (3) or section 200.9(f)(2)(x) of this Part and shall assure that:

(a) the chronological age range within special classes serving preschool students with disabilities shall not exceed 36 months, except that, upon application and documented educational justification to the commissioner, approval may be granted for variance from the special class chronological age range;

(b) the maximum class size shall not exceed 12 preschool students with at least one teacher and one or more supplementary school personnel assigned to each class:

(1) If a committee on preschool special education recommends a preschool student to an approved program which has no space available in the specific special class which will meet the student’s unique needs as recommended on the IEP, the approved program may temporarily increase the enrollment of a class up to a maximum of 13 preschool students for the remainder of the school year, by a procedure to be established by the Commissioner, to ensure that the student receives a free appropriate public education. If the attendance during the instructional time exceeds 12 students, another staff member shall be assigned to the class. Other staff members may include related service providers and/or supplementary school personnel.

(c) such services shall be provided for not less than two and one half hours per day, two days per week;

(iv) in-state residential special education programs and services shall be provided to each preschool student with a disability for whom such services have been recommended for a minimum of five hours per day, five days per week. Placement in such residential programs shall be approved by the commissioner in accordance with section 200.6(j) of this Part;

(v) 12-month special services and/or programs shall be provided to eligible preschool students with disabilities consistent with their individual needs, as specified in their individualized education programs. Preschool students with disabilities may be considered for such special services and/or programs in accordance with their need to prevent substantial regression if they are:

(a) preschool students whose management needs are determined to be highly intensive and require a high degree of individualized attention and intervention; or

(b) preschool students with severe multiple disabilities, whose programs consist primarily of habilitation and treatment; or

(c) preschool students whose special education needs are determined to be highly intensive and require a high degree of individualized attention and intervention or who have severe multiple disabilities and require primarily habilitation and treatment in the home; or

(d) preschool students whose needs are so severe that they can be met only in a seven-day residential program; or

(e) preschool students who are not described in clauses (a) through (d) of this subparagraph whose disabilities are severe enough to exhibit the need for a structured learning environment of 12 months duration to prevent substantial regression as determined by the preschool committee on special education.

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Privately Operated Programs

A student is placed in such a state approved private school program when no public program is appropriate or available to meet that student’s particular need(s). The program is supervised by the administration of that facility and is monitored by our district’s CSE. Programs include local BOCES classes and other local private schools that appropriately meet the individual needs of students determined by the CSE.

State Operated Schools

Such schools are administered by the State Education Department to meet the needs of severely impaired youngsters, through a variety of programs. These include schools

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Classification by Disability as of June 30, 2018

Disability Total Students
Autism 86
Deafness 1
Emotional Disturbance

39

Hearing Impairment 2
Intellectual Disability 18
Learning Disability 386
Multiple Disabilities 41
Orthopedic Impairment 3
Other Health Impairment

220

Speech or Language Impairment

92

Traumatic Brain Injury

2

Visual Impairment

2

Grand Total

892

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Department Objectives:

  1. Continue to review Out of District placements for potential to return to the Least Restrictive Environment (LRE)-  The Out of District/Preschool School Psychologist will aide in the review of student placements at BOCES and other private schools. The Director and Psychologist will ascertain the overall needs of students and work toward developing in district programs that will both prevent out of district placements and allow for the return of students who are ready to return to the LRE. 
                                                                                                                                                  
  2. The addition of a Behavior Intervention Specialist will focus on coordinating Functional Assessments of Behavior and Behavior Intervention Plans that address students’ interfering  behaviors and provide a means to help the students self-regulate and thereby become more academically successful. The Behavior Intervention Specialist will also assist in providing classroom and school-wide behavior management strategies to school teams.
     
  3. During the 19-20 school year, the addition of the ABLE class for grades 3-5 for the students moving up into these grades will allow for continued programming and support in the school district for students with severe communication disorders as they move through the grade levels.
     
  4. During the 19-20 school year, the addition of the CASTLE program for grades 6-8 will allow for a seamless transition to middle school. Also, the addition of a grades K-2 class will help to make this a coherent program throughout the school district.
     
  5. Technology Training for special education teachers will be part of our department meeting agendas as well as coaching sessions with the technology support staff in the school buildings. Training will be provided for special education in a varied areas in order to:
    a. Allow teachers greater opportunities for differentiation
    b. Allow students greater access to grade level curriculum opportunities
    c. Support skill development for those students with skill area deficits
    d. Encourage greater cooperative learning opportunities
    e. Encourage greater independence of students with disabilities
    f. Allow students to have more ownership of learning
     
  6. Exploration of Assistive Technology options will continue in order to identify additional technology options available to specifically allow students to access grade level materials when reading skills are below grade level. These options will be identified, explored, and shared at department meetings with teachers as well as during meetings with the district’s assistive technology consultant.
  7. Multisensory, systematic, sequential phonics program will be incorporated into elementary special education literacy development. Teachers will be trained to identify students needing supplementary multisensory reading instruction. Implementation of the Preventing Academic Failure, (PAF-an Orton-Gillingham Reading Program) and Wilson Reading program for those students identified will be incorporated into their reading instruction.
  8. Integrated co-teaching professional development will focus on the philosophy of co-teaching, methods of co-teaching, and roles and responsibilities within the co-taught setting. Professional development will include both the general education and special education teachers in the ICT classrooms. 
     
  9. In order to continue to improve the quality of our district’s IEPs,  special education teachers will receive updated professional development on how to effectively write and update an IEP. The focus for the next 2 years will be on writing better Goals and Objectives, Present Levels of Performance and how to align those two areas with program recommendations.
     
  10. In order to continue to improve the quality of our district’s special education programming and student success, CSE chairpersons will receive updated professional development on effective facilitation of data driven CSE meetings. This will result in data driven decisions for student placement recommendations. Special Education Regulations (Part 200) will also continually be reviewed to ensure best practices.
     

Program Evaluation

The goal of the special education program in the District is to provide each student with individualized instruction designed to help the student compensate for his or her disability in order to access and make progress in the curriculum.  The methods used to evaluate the extent to which the objectives of the special education program have been achieved are:

  • Ongoing evaluation of pupil achievement using various standardized diagnostic tests and other teacher made assessments;
  • Annual reviews of students’ progress and programs, resulting in revised comprehensive IEPs;
  • Qualitative techniques such as teacher observations and conferences, classroom observations anecdotal reports, and end-of-year student summaries:
  • Reevaluation of each pupil with a disability as outlined in Regulations of the Commissioner; and
  • Two year review of the District Plan for Special Education.

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Allocation of Appropriate Space:

It is the policy and practice of the Board of Education to ensure, to the fullest extent possible, that students with disabilities residing in the District shall be educated within the District and whenever appropriate, students with disabilities will be placed in their home school. Special education services shall not be denied simply because of a lack of appropriate space.

Further, it is the policy and practice of the Board of Education to ensure, to the fullest extent possible, that appropriate space will be available to meet the needs of resident students with disabilities who attend special education programs provided by the Board of Cooperative Education Services (BOCES).  At least once per year, a staff member from the District’s Special Education Department will visit each resident student who attends a BOCES special education program to assure the appropriateness of the space allocated for that placement.

The District will continue to meet with Sullivan BOCES to work toward NY State Education Department’s requirement in developing the regional plan that reduces the number of special education students in center based settings.  In addition, in an attempt to provide space, to the extent available, for school-age students from other school Districts who need special programs not available in their home schools.  The District will also attempt to provide the Board of Cooperative Educational Services with grade appropriate space for resident and nonresident students if such space is available.

Alternative Format of Materials:

Instructional materials in alternative formats are available for students with disabilities in a usable alternative format, which meet National Instructional Materials Accessibility Standard in accordance with appendix C to part 300 of title 34 of the Code of Federal Regulations (Code of Federal Regulations, 2009 edition, title 34, part 300, appendix C, Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, DC 20402-0001; 2009 – available at the Office of Counsel, New York State Education Department, State Education Building Room 148, 89 Washington Avenue, Albany, New York 12234), for each student with a disability in accordance with the student’s educational needs and course selections at the same time that such materials are available to nondisabled students.

All K-12 General Education materials are available for modification and use with the K-12 students with disability population. Special Education teachers and related service staff are included in all district-wide professional development surrounding the NYS Common Core Learning Standards. Special education teachers modify curriculum and differentiate instruction to meet the individualized education plan needs of their students.

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Special Education Budget (estimated):

Salaries, Tutoring $15,000
Salaries, Instructional $7,295,952
Salaries, Non-Instructional $2,177,552
Contractual Expenses $12,500
Copy Charges $3,400
Professional Services $27,500
Materials and Supplies $45,500
Tuition, other districts $85,500
Tuition, other facilities $1,875,000
38.424% district share/maintenance $360,000
BOCES services $8,300,000
Professional Salaries, CPSE $6,500
equipment $4,500
Contractual, postage, conferences $3,000
Psychological supplies $7,500
Materials/Supplies $3,000

 

Date of Board of Education Adoption of Plan:

The Board of Education will adopt the plan on 8/21/2018.

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Pine Bush Central School District
State Route 302, Pine Bush, NY 12566
Phone: (845) 744-2031
Fax: (845) 744-6189
Tim O. Mains
Superintendent of Schools
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